DLF Social Event Checklist

Overview This checklist is designed to help you to evaluate possible social event venues to ensure that they are inclusive and welcoming for all participants. While you will likely not be able to answer all of these questions in the affirmative for all venues, by confirming this information and sharing it with attendees, you can help to make sure that attendees can make informed decisions about what venues to visit and that there are at least some venues for all needs included in the final list of affiliated social events. DLF is committed to creating and supporting inclusive, diverse, and equitable communities of practice. We expect participants in the DLF community to help create thoughtful, safe, and respectful environments where that interaction can take place. All attendees of DLF-sponsored events on and off the conference site are required to follow the Code of Conduct. PDF Version Microsoft Word Version Physical Accessibility Is the entrance accessible for those with mobility issues? Sufficiently wide doorways (32 inches from the face of the door to the opposite stop)? Automatic doorways? Step free access? If there is a wheelchair lift, is there an alternative for those who cannot do stairs but do not use a wheelchair? Is there disability access parking? Is there a space to be dropped off in front of the accessible entrance or nearby? Is the event location on an accessible floor? Note: Some event spaces are on upper floors. Do not assume that the space you have reserved is on the ground floor without confirmation. Does the event have a clear policy allowing service animals? This is required by law, but it is good to confirm that there won’t be any confusion. Are the event staff adequately trained in the policy permitting service animals? Does the venue have relief areas for service animals? Does the event permit emotional support animals? How are the acoustics for conversations? Will it be difficult for hard of hearing attendees to participate in the event? Is the lighting sufficient? Does the venue use strobe or otherwise flashing lights? What is the layout of the room? Are aisles 36 inches wide and free of barriers? Is there accessible, integrated seating available throughout the space? Is there an accessible restroom? Located on the same floor as the event or reachable by elevator? Sufficiently wide doorways? Automatic doorway? Step free access? Sufficiently large stalls and/or dedicated single-occupant restrooms? Is there clearly marked signage? For example, Braille and tactile language, easy-to-read font and large font size. Restrooms Entrances and exits Elevators Drop-off and pick-up points Cost What is the overall cost of the food and drink? (This can just be a range or approximate.) Are there adequate options that are less expensive? Is the venue cash only or does it accept credit cards? Does the venue allow for customers to split checks? Does the venue accommodate groups requesting individual checks? Beverages Are non-alcoholic beverages available? Are kosher beverages available? Are halal beverages available? Food Is vegetarian food available? Is vegan food available? Is gluten free food available? Is kosher food available? Is halal food available? Can the restaurant accommodate food allergies? If so, does it require advance notice? Does the event carry epinephrine pens and is the staff adequately trained in recognizing and immediately addressing allergic reactions? Does the restaurant provide large print or Braille menus? Is there a children’s menu available? LGBTQIA+ Friendliness Is the establishment advertised as LGBTQIA+ friendly? (In addition to checking the venue website, consider checking Yelp, social media, and other reviews) Is there an all gender restroom available? What are the restroom policies? Miscellaneous What is the overall noisiness of the venue (scale of 1–5)? Is there a private lactation room? Are parents welcome to nurse in public? Is there a separate quiet space for those who need to step away? What style of event is this venue well-suited for? For example, sit down dinner, standing conversation, etc. Does the venue have a theme (influencing the architecture, staff, food, music, and/or overall presentation of the venue)? Is the venue’s theme appropriate and respectful? Is the venue themed around a particular experience (e.g., line dancing, karaoke, trivia, etc.)? If so, does it present additional costs for attendees and is the experience accessible? If the venue or chain has a theme, consider whether it is appropriate for a professional event. How far from the conference center is this venue? Is the location accessible by public transportation? How will attendees travel to the venue? For events held at a hotel, hotel staff usually can recommend companies that provide accessible vans for transportation. If you are planning a social event during a conference, you may want to contact the conference manager for information on any available resources. Does the venue have a specific dress code? If so, what is it? Tips Contact the venue a few days before the event to confirm that all facilities, i.e., elevators or wheelchair lifts, are working. Make it clear if attendees will need to contact the venue in advance for any special accommodations, such as to request food that meets specific dietary restrictions. In promotional materials, provide contact information with various options (e.g., email, telephone, online) and all available accessibility information you have collected from the venue. Additionally, ask attendees to specify their needs ahead of time. Additional Resources Planning Accessible Meetings and Events: A Toolkit, American Bar Association (ABA) Ensuring Your Venue is Inclusive, OpenCon Report on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion This checklist was created on April 2018 by Carli Spina as a 2018 DLF Forum Inclusivity Committee subgroup initiative to help social event organizers plan welcoming and inclusive events. We thank the 2018 DLF Forum Inclusivity Committee and the LITA Diversity and Inclusion Committee for their input. To offer suggestions, please comment on the working document or contact info@diglib.org.

Recording available for IRUS-USA Webinar

Interested in visualizing, measuring, and comparing usage stats from your institutional repository? IRUS-USA (Institutional Repository Usage Statistics USA) is an experimental collaboration between Jisc and the Digital Library Federation (DLF) at CLIR. Based on the successful IRUS-UK model and with the support of DLF’s Assessment Interest Group (the DLF-AIG), IRUS-USA provides COUNTER-compliant usage statistics for content downloaded from DLF member institutions whose repositories are participating in the pilot project. Check out our March 23rd, 2018 webinar and Q&A session recording — about IRUS-USA, some related community projects and efforts by our Digital Library Assessment Interest Group, what we’ve learned so far in this experiment, and evaluation and next steps! The pilot project runs through this summer. Recording: Video and Audio Recording + Audio Recording only Slides: Powerpoint + PDF For any questions to DLF, please write to info@diglib.org. If you have questions for the Jisc team, please write to help@jisc.ac.uk with “IRUS” in the title or body of your email message. To learn more about the CLIR/DLF and Jisc partnership, please read our announcement.

DLF staff promotions!

oday, in recognition of their brilliant and indispensable contributions to the DLF community, to position them to do even more good, and as we look forward to welcoming a new colleague in 2018 (still accepting applications!)—the Digital Library Federation is announcing promotions and title changes for staff members Katherine Kim and Becca Quon. Please join us in congratulating Katherine Kim, new Assistant Director of the DLF, and Becca Quon, DLF Program Associate for Advancement and Awards!  As Assistant Director, Katherine will be taking a stronger hand in budgeting, strategic planning, development and management of events (including the annual DLF Forum and our experiments in supporting local/regional meetings—”DLFx”), and in representing the Digital Library Federation to working group leaders, CLIR/DLF affiliate organizations, and as a partner within the wider community. As Program Associate for Advancement and Awards, Becca will take greater ownership of programs that create opportunities and contribute to the professional development of individual community members, such as DLF fellowships, grants, and awards, our jobs service (no pressure!), and learning opportunities, including the eResearch Network, workshops and webinars, and forthcoming programs under the banner of “Learn@DLF.” We’re a highly collaborative, small team, dedicated to serving DLFers in their shared mission, so we encourage you to continue to reach out to us jointly as appropriate, by sending queries to info@diglib.org. Individual contact info for Katherine, Becca, key CLIR colleagues and programs, and DLF Executive Director Bethany Nowviskie is also available here.

Join our team! DLF Program Assistant for Conferences and Events

e are excited to announce an open position at the DLF! We’re hiring for a brand-new role: DLF Program Assistant for Conferences and Events. This person will join our team to work closely with colleagues at CLIR and DLF along with volunteer program committee members from our community, to help make our annual DLF Forum–as well as other national and regional DLF events–a great success. The DLF Forum is our signature event. Each year, we are inspired by and in awe of the collaborative, collegial work of the DLF community on display there. We are thrilled to expand our own little team as we strive to create and support inclusive, diverse, and equitable communities of digital library practice. To that end, we are particularly interested in applications from members of underrepresented groups. Please read on for more information about the position and application details! If you have any questions, please contact Team DLF–Bethany, Becca, and Katherine–at info@diglib.org. DLF Program Assistant for Conferences and Events The Digital Library Federation seeks an enterprising and organized event planner to support the vibrant CLIR/DLF practitioner community and meetings that engage our member organizations, which include libraries, museums, publishers, government agencies, nonprofits, and more. This position will center around development, planning, implementation, and follow-up for our signature conference, the DLF Forum, as well as other national and regional CLIR and DLF meetings and events. Responsibilities include: Effectively and efficiently organizing the planning and logistics of small events and large conferences Working with various volunteer committees involved in program planning, to help them achieve their goals and objectives Scouting for meeting spaces, negotiating with venues, and finalizing contracts Serving as primary contact person for vendors, including hotel, catering, childcare, and audio-visual services Tracking finances and collecting payments as well as monitoring registration activity and hotel pick-up Overseeing materials and supplies needed for events, including keeping a running inventory prior to major events Marketing events and communicating professionally with attendees Assisting with related administrative duties as assigned. This is a full-time position based at the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), with excellent benefits that include full health coverage, liberal leave and other employment policies, support for professional development, and a very generous retirement plan. Salary is commensurate with experience (with anticipated ranges starting at $58,000 per annum). Preference will be given to candidates who can work at least part time in CLIR’s Washington, D.C. offices, but remote working arrangements are possible. Review of applications will begin immediately, with a desired start-date in early 2018. Required qualifications: Detail oriented and able to manage and prioritize multiple concurrent projects and tasks Strong organizational and time management skills Strong oral communication and interpersonal skills and proven ability to work as part of a collaborative team Experience in program coordination, conference planning and/or event planning Excellent computer skills and experience with administrative work, including familiarity with website, e-commerce, and content management systems (such as WordPress, PayPal/Stripe, Sched) or proven ability to learn quickly Excellent writing and proofreading/editing skills Ability and willingness to travel several times per year. Desired qualifications: Proven ability to work with meeting site personnel, caterers, and other service providers Formal credentials or desire for professional development in hospitality services and event planning Desire to learn about and contribute to the digital library community The Digital Library Federation (www.diglib.org) is a member organization established in 1995 as a program of CLIR: www.clir.org. DLF’s mission is to advance research, learning, social justice, and the public good through the creative design and wise application of digital library technologies. CLIR is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to diversity. We especially encourage applications to this position by people of color and members of other under-represented groups. To apply, please send a cover letter and a resume or CV in a single PDF document to work@clir.org, with the subject line “DLF Program Assistant application.”

Membership Cohorts

e host lots of thematic working groups, engaging individual community members and reaching well beyond the institutions that support DLF as members. But as our institutional membershipship grows and becomes more heterogeneous, we see added value in supporting cohorts–groups of DLF institutions that share common challenges and opportunities. Here are our first two such membership cohorts. If you would like to: take a leadership role in our DLF Liberal Arts Colleges or DLF Museums cohorts; foster institutional connections among similar organizations not covered here; or help DLF bolster membership in institutional categories that matter to you–please get in touch!

DLFxDHSI: 8-9 June 2018 

ave the date! Yes, it’s early, but we want you to mark your calendars now — because in June of 2018, the Digital Library Federation (DLF) is returning to Canada! We’re excited to announce that planning has begun for DLFxDSHI — a digital libraries + DH unconference, to be hosted in partnership with our friends at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) in beautiful Victoria, BC. The event will begin with a joint DHSI and DLF Institute Lecture, poster/digital demo session, and reception on Friday, 8 June 2018. Highly collaborative and interactive DLFx unconference sessions will run throughout the day on Saturday, June 9th, followed by short DHSI workshops on Sunday, June 10th. Stay late to participate in DLFx after the first week of DHSI classes, come early to join us before the second week, visit just for DLFx, or plan to spend a full fortnight expanding your mind and digital library/digital humanities skill sets in an inspiring setting—it’s up to you! And don’t forget that everyone affiliated with a DLF member institution gets a significant discount on tuition at DHSI! (That goes for faculty and students as well.) Registration for DLFxDHSI will open alongside Digital Humanities Summer Institute registration later this year, and DLF will issue a separate call for peer-reviewed poster and demo presentations in early 2018. Look for announcements of other DLFx events, soon, and we invite you to contact us if you’d like to host a themed digital libraries/archives unconference or event series in collaboration with the Digital Library Federation.

Guide to Creating Accessible Presentations

One of DLF’s strengths is that its membership & Forums are inclusive sites for exchange. Our members participate in a variety of cultural and disciplinary communities and bring with them to the Forum many different professional and personal experiences and learning styles. To help you effectively engage with this diverse and dynamic community, we offer these practical recommendations for creating accessible presentations. In the words of the Society for Disability Studies, we invite you to “think about issues of privilege and injustice and to reflect on the inclusions and exclusions” that may exist in your audience as you prepare Forum sessions. Delivering Presentations & Facilitating Discussion Speak clearly, loudly, and at a moderate rate. Use pauses to allow for processing time. Minimize the use of jargon and acronyms, or clearly explain them in your talk. Repeat audience questions into a mic, if need be. Provide clear verbal descriptions of visual content, such as images, charts, and videos. Imagine delivering your presentation on the radio. Provide captioning of films and video clips. Provide a textual version of presentations either in slide notes or in a document accompanying slide decks. Make presentation materials available in advance so that participants with different needs can follow along on their own devices. We encourage use of DLF’s dedicated repository for 2016 Forum presentations. Refrain from wearing perfume, cologne, or other strongly scented products. Designing Presentation Materials Design presentation materials for accessibility when presenting and when sharing materials to DLF Forum & Digital Preservation 2016 Posters & Talks on the Open Science Framework. Make Text Easy to See Provide minimal text on each slide (only a few points). Maintain a large font size. Start with 28–32 point font. Design for people seated both close to and far from a projected screen and for people reading on screens small and large. Select fonts for readability. Often sans serif typefaces are more readable on screens. Avoid all caps. Use a high contrast color scheme. To check for good contrast, use a contrast checker. Provide Clear Text Alternatives to Non-Textual Content Provide quality alt text for images. Seek out recommendations for writing great alt text. Alt text serves different functions for different types of informational content. Alt text should: Identify textual content. For example, hyperlink meaningful text, such as the title of the linked resource, rather than the raw URL or opaque phrases like “Click here.” Explain visual content, such as images, charts, and videos. Describe aural content, such as audio and video. Use built-in options for tables, charts, and data visualizations, if possible, rather than importing as an image. Otherwise, provide text alternatives through other means: Provide explanatory text in the slide notes. Hide explanatory text in a text box underneath the inserted image. Explain the image in visible text. If you insert data as an image, use alt text to tell the reader what the image is and where it is located. Design Your Content to Be Interpreted by Assistive Technology Use a templated slide format. For example, rather than adding text boxes to existing layouts, add new content placeholders to the slide master. Customize the reading order of elements added to slides. By default, applications such as PowerPoint and Google Slides arrange elements in the order in which they were added to the slide. Often this order does not make sense to a reader accessing presentation content through assistive technology. Arrange slide elements in an order that makes sense when being read by a screen reader. When in doubt, use built-in formatting options for charts, bullet points, shapes, etc. Perform an Accessibility Check Recent versions of Microsoft Office provide an accessibility checker in the ‘Tools’ menu under ‘Check Accessibility.’ Recent versions of Adobe applications provide an accessibility checker in the ‘Tools’ menu under ‘Accessibility.’ In the secondary toolbar click on ‘Full Check.’ Google Apps do not have built-in accessibility checkers; however, you could download materials created with Google Apps as Microsoft Office documents or PDFs in order to check accessibility of your presentation materials as offline documents. Additional Resources Broad frameworks for creating accessible presentations Accessibility at the 2016 American Society for Theatre Research & Theatre Library Association Conference How to make visual presentations accessible to audience members with print impairments, adapted for the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)  by Minna von Zansen and Jenny Craven from the World Blind Union Guidelines Make Your Presentations Accessible: Seven Easy Steps by Whitney Quesenbery Guidance specific to presentation software Accessible Digital Office Document (ADOD) Project (step-by-step guidelines for creating accessible materials in a range of commonly used software applications) Microsoft Word: Creating Accessible Documents by WebAIM (Web Accessibility in Mind) PDF Accessibility by WebAIM (Web Accessibility in Mind) PowerPoint Accessibility by WebAIM (Web Accessibility in Mind) Seven Steps to Creating an Accessible PowerPoint Slideshow by Disability Access Services of California’s Department of Rehabilitation Acknowledgements This guide distills many excellent existing resources on creating accessible meetings and events into a succinct set of recommendations for Forum presenters to follow in order to create an inclusive experience for Forum participants. It was created in October 2016 by a subgroup of the 2016 DLF Forum Inclusivity Committee: Eleanor Dickson, Digital Humanities Specialist, HathiTrust Research Center Chelcie Juliet Rowell, Digital Initiatives Librarian, Wake Forest University Yasmeen L. Shorish, Data Services Coordinator Librarian, James Madison University We are especially indebted to Whitney Quesenbery’s Make Your Presentations Accessible: Seven Easy Steps and the Accessibility at the 2016 American Society for Theatre Research & Theatre Library Association Conference guide. The clarity and comprehensiveness of these recommendations were strengthened by the input of Bethany Nowviskie and members of the broader Inclusivity Committee.   To offer feedback, please comment on the working document or contact info@diglib.org.  

Call for Proposals

The Digital Library Federation invites proposals for the 2017 DLF Forum, to be held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 23-25, 2017. Separate calls will be issued for allied meetings: the DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Pre-Conference (October 22) and Digital Preservation 2017, the annual conference of the National Digital Stewardship Alliance (October 25-26). Proposals are due by May 22nd at 11:59pm Pacific Time.   About DLF and the Forum: The DLF community works to advance research, learning, social justice, and the public good through the creative design and wise application of digital library technologies. Our annual Forum (#DLFforum) brings digital library, archives, and museum practitioners together to set ambitious agendas, share new methods and experiments, develop best practices, and better organize our community to accomplish its shared mission. Proposals are encouraged from DLF members and non-members alike. All are welcome at the Forum and warmly encouraged to participate in DLF’s programs year-round.   The 2017 Forum will be held at the Westin Convention Center, just steps away from countless Pittsburgh attractions including Market Square and the Andy Warhol Museum. We strive to create a safe, accessible, welcoming, and inclusive event that reflects our Code of Conduct. Once again, the Forum will include childcare subsidies, gender-neutral bathrooms, a quiet room, color-coded lanyards for photography preferences, badges that reflect preferred pronouns, accessible spaces for all, accessibility tips for presenters, and attention to dietary preferences and other needs collected through our registration form. To make suggestions or ask questions of DLF Forum organizers and our volunteer committee on inclusivity, please contact us at info@diglib.org. Submissions and Evaluation: The Forum traditionally has no set theme so that it may speak to matters of interest to all, including: digital library, archives, and museum collections and resources; technologies and infrastructure; services and programs; staffing, education, and professional development; social contexts and ethics; labor and vendor relations; or other DLF community missions, priorities, problems, and concerns. We depend on you to propose action-oriented topics geared toward a practitioner audience, considering aspects of design, labor, social responsibility, leadership, collaboration, implementation, and assessment. We also welcome community-spirited proposals by digital library practitioners from the commercial sector; however, please note that vendor tables are available for promoting or selling products or services.   Proposals of up to 250 words each (up to 500 words for full panel sessions) should be submitted along with a 50-word short abstract for the program, using our online system: https://conftool.pro/dlf2017/.   Submissions are invited in the following lengths and formats: 20-minute Presentations or 1-hour Panels: Traditional format, but with a premium on conversation. Presentations are allocated 20 minutes (including Q&A), and organized panels with 4 or more speakers will be given a dedicated session. Panel organizers are especially encouraged to include as diverse an array of perspectives and voices as possible.  Speakers should reserve significant time for interactive exchanges on next steps, possible DLF community action, and discussion or debate. 6-minute Snapshots: Brief talks, meant to engage, inform, and energize the audience: reports of work in progress, new technologies and services, questions or provocations, and more. Snapshots will be grouped based on overarching themes or ideas. 90-second Lightning Talks: High-profile, high-energy lightning talks, held in a plenary session, with the opportunity to point listeners to additional information online. Interested speakers can submit abstracts now, to appear on the program—or sign up the day of the event , while space lasts! Sign up sheets will be at the registration desk. Workshops: In-depth, hands-on training sessions on specific tools, techniques, workflows, or concepts. Workshop organizers are asked to provide details in the proposal on learning outcomes for participants, technology needs, and to specify both the ideal and minimum number of consecutive, one-hour sessions needed for the workshop. Lunchtime Working Sessions: Use the Forum to organize and get stuff done! These are Birds-of-a-Feather sessions for community organizers, creative problem solvers, and existing or prospective DLF interest groups. Participants eat together while discussing a specific challenge or issue that would benefit from a collective approach. Deadline: Monday, May 22nd, 2017 at 11:59pm Pacific Time.   All submissions will be peer-reviewed by our volunteer Program Committee. Broader DLF community input will be welcomed through an open process to be announced in May, the results of which will help inform the Program Committee’s final decisions. Presenters will be notified in July and guaranteed a registration slot at the Forum.

Re-Affirmation and DLF Organizers’ Toolkit

For the Digital Library Federation, November 10th saw the close of a joyful and self-consciously more inclusive 2016 DLF Forum, characterized by deeper critical introspection, the clarion leadership of our keynote speakers, broad sharing of best practices and the fruits of community-spirited labor, and increasing resolve to support our collective mission to advance research, learning, social justice, and the public good through the creative design and wise application of digital library technologies. It also saw the close of a bitterly contentious and divisive national presidential election and the opening of a fortnight of violence, fear, and emboldened hate. DLF director Bethany Nowviskie addressed the community on November 10th with an “Open Invitation” to use the Digital Library Federation as a counter-platform to forces like these: “Use this federation, this DLF. It is yours. Its whole purpose is to be a framework for what you need. [Use it] to create—or resist.”  It is in that spirit that we re-affirm the DLF’s longstanding commitment to diversity, inclusion, equity, and social justice. Now more than ever, organizations like the Digital Library Federation, the institutions that make up our membership, and the countless individual people who so generously volunteer their time through DLF channels, to work toward the most noble purposes and possibilities for library tech, must stand up for our professional values—values like intellectual freedom and the open exchange of ideas, privacy and security, the honoring of cultural understanding and scientific expertise, and an unwavering commitment to equitable access to information in safe and welcoming digital and physical environments. We must also stand for our shared humanity, and the protection and liberation of the most vulnerable and least free among us. It is in the spirit of community-based platforms for creation and resistance that we offer a new DLF Organizers’ Toolkit. The Digital Library Federation enthusiastically invites you to use this toolkit (as a guide to using us better!), and we welcome your help in improving the resources gathered there. Visit the DLF Organizers’ Toolkit Review our recently-updated Digital Library Federation Code of Conduct Contact DLF leadership or all staff with questions and comments

Re-Affirmation and DLF Organizers’ Toolkit

For the Digital Library Federation, November 10th saw the close of a joyful and self-consciously more inclusive 2016 DLF Forum, characterized by deeper critical introspection, the clarion leadership of our keynote speakers, broad sharing of best practices and the fruits of community-spirited labor, and increasing resolve to support our collective mission to advance research, learning, social justice, and the public good through the creative design and wise application of digital library technologies. It also saw the close of a bitterly contentious and divisive national presidential election and the opening of a fortnight of violence, fear, and emboldened hate. DLF director Bethany Nowviskie addressed the community on November 10th with an “Open Invitation” to use the Digital Library Federation as a counter-platform to forces like these: “Use this federation, this DLF. It is yours. Its whole purpose is to be a framework for what you need. [Use it] to create—or resist.”  It is in that spirit that we re-affirm the DLF’s longstanding commitment to diversity, inclusion, equity, and social justice. Now more than ever, organizations like the Digital Library Federation, the institutions that make up our membership, and the countless individual people who so generously volunteer their time through DLF channels, to work toward the most noble purposes and possibilities for library tech, must stand up for our professional values—values like intellectual freedom and the open exchange of ideas, privacy and security, the honoring of cultural understanding and scientific expertise, and an unwavering commitment to equitable access to information in safe and welcoming digital and physical environments. We must also stand for our shared humanity, and the protection and liberation of the most vulnerable and least free among us. It is in the spirit of community-based platforms for creation and resistance that we offer a new DLF Organizers’ Toolkit. The Digital Library Federation enthusiastically invites you to use this toolkit (as a guide to using us better!), and we welcome your help in improving the resources gathered there. Visit the DLF Organizers’ Toolkit Review our recently-updated Digital Library Federation Code of Conduct Contact DLF leadership or all staff with questions and comments

Guide to Creating Accessible Presentations

One of DLF’s strengths is that its membership & Forums are inclusive sites for exchange. Our members participate in a variety of cultural and disciplinary communities and bring with them to the Forum many different professional and personal experiences and learning styles. To help you effectively engage with this diverse and dynamic community, we offer these practical recommendations for creating accessible presentations. In the words of the Society for Disability Studies, we invite you to “think about issues of privilege and injustice and to reflect on the inclusions and exclusions” that may exist in your audience as you prepare Forum sessions. Delivering Presentations & Facilitating Discussion Speak clearly, loudly, and at a moderate rate. Use pauses to allow for processing time. Minimize the use of jargon and acronyms, or clearly explain them in your talk. Repeat audience questions into a mic, if need be. Provide clear verbal descriptions of visual content, such as images, charts, and videos. Imagine delivering your presentation on the radio. Provide captioning of films and video clips. Provide a textual version of presentations either in slide notes or in a document accompanying slide decks. Make presentation materials available in advance so that participants with different needs can follow along on their own devices. We encourage use of DLF’s dedicated repository for 2016 Forum presentations. Refrain from wearing perfume, cologne, or other strongly scented products. Designing Presentation Materials Design presentation materials for accessibility when presenting and when sharing materials to DLF Forum & Digital Preservation 2016 Posters & Talks on the Open Science Framework. Make Text Easy to See Provide minimal text on each slide (only a few points). Maintain a large font size. Start with 28–32 point font. Design for people seated both close to and far from a projected screen and for people reading on screens small and large. Select fonts for readability. Often sans serif typefaces are more readable on screens. Avoid all caps. Use a high contrast color scheme. To check for good contrast, use a contrast checker. Provide Clear Text Alternatives to Non-Textual Content Provide quality alt text for images. Seek out recommendations for writing great alt text. Alt text serves different functions for different types of informational content. Alt text should: Identify textual content. For example, hyperlink meaningful text, such as the title of the linked resource, rather than the raw URL or opaque phrases like “Click here.” Explain visual content, such as images, charts, and videos. Describe aural content, such as audio and video. Use built-in options for tables, charts, and data visualizations, if possible, rather than importing as an image. Otherwise, provide text alternatives through other means: Provide explanatory text in the slide notes. Hide explanatory text in a text box underneath the inserted image. Explain the image in visible text. If you insert data as an image, use alt text to tell the reader what the image is and where it is located. Design Your Content to Be Interpreted by Assistive Technology Use a templated slide format. For example, rather than adding text boxes to existing layouts, add new content placeholders to the slide master. Customize the reading order of elements added to slides. By default, applications such as PowerPoint and Google Slides arrange elements in the order in which they were added to the slide. Often this order does not make sense to a reader accessing presentation content through assistive technology. Arrange slide elements in an order that makes sense when being read by a screen reader. When in doubt, use built-in formatting options for charts, bullet points, shapes, etc. Perform an Accessibility Check Recent versions of Microsoft Office provide an accessibility checker in the ‘Tools’ menu under ‘Check Accessibility.’ Recent versions of Adobe applications provide an accessibility checker in the ‘Tools’ menu under ‘Accessibility.’ In the secondary toolbar click on ‘Full Check.’ Google Apps do not have built-in accessibility checkers; however, you could download materials created with Google Apps as Microsoft Office documents or PDFs in order to check accessibility of your presentation materials as offline documents. Additional Resources Broad frameworks for creating accessible presentations Accessibility at the 2016 American Society for Theatre Research & Theatre Library Association Conference How to make visual presentations accessible to audience members with print impairments, adapted for the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)  by Minna von Zansen and Jenny Craven from the World Blind Union Guidelines Make Your Presentations Accessible: Seven Easy Steps by Whitney Quesenbery Guidance specific to presentation software Accessible Digital Office Document (ADOD) Project (step-by-step guidelines for creating accessible materials in a range of commonly used software applications) Microsoft Word: Creating Accessible Documents by WebAIM (Web Accessibility in Mind) PDF Accessibility by WebAIM (Web Accessibility in Mind) PowerPoint Accessibility by WebAIM (Web Accessibility in Mind) Seven Steps to Creating an Accessible PowerPoint Slideshow by Disability Access Services of California’s Department of Rehabilitation Acknowledgements This guide distills many excellent existing resources on creating accessible meetings and events into a succinct set of recommendations for Forum presenters to follow in order to create an inclusive experience for Forum participants. It was created in October 2016 by a subgroup of the 2016 DLF Forum Inclusivity Committee: Eleanor Dickson, Digital Humanities Specialist, HathiTrust Research Center Chelcie Juliet Rowell, Digital Initiatives Librarian, Wake Forest University Yasmeen L. Shorish, Data Services Coordinator Librarian, James Madison University We are especially indebted to Whitney Quesenbery’s Make Your Presentations Accessible: Seven Easy Steps and the Accessibility at the 2016 American Society for Theatre Research & Theatre Library Association Conference guide. The clarity and comprehensiveness of these recommendations were strengthened by the input of Bethany Nowviskie and members of the broader Inclusivity Committee.   To offer feedback, please comment on the working document or contact info@diglib.org.  

Seeking Self-Nominations for DLF Advisory Committee

The Digital Library Federation seeks to expand its DLF Advisory Committee by one to two new representatives, drawn from among our member organizations and wider practitioner community. DLF has grown considerably in recent years, and is strongly committed to creating and supporting inclusive, diverse, and equitable communities of digital library practice. New perspectives are therefore needed to better reflect the increasing diversity of DLF’s membership and of the professionals and publics we serve. We see a particular need for representation from DLF’s growing segment of liberal arts colleges, as well as from public libraries, museums, and HBCUs—but we primarily seek self-nominations from people whose professional backgrounds and personal identities, convictions, and life experiences could enrich the work of the Committee. About the DLF Advisory Committee: The function of the Advisory Committee is to provide counsel to the DLF Director. DLF “Community Advisors” are appointed for three-year terms, renewable once, subject to the approval of CLIR’s Board. The Committee meets annually in Washington, DC each Spring (with travel fully funded) and informally in the Fall (with support for conference registration) at the DLF Forum. Learn more about the governance of the DLF: https://www.diglib.org/members/governance/ and about the Advisory Committee: https://www.diglib.org/members/advisory/ About the Digital Library Federation: The Digital Library Federation is a robust and diverse community of practitioners who advance research, learning, social justice, and the public good through the creative design and wise application of digital library technologies. DLF serves as a resource and catalyst for collaboration among archives, libraries and library service organizations, publishers, labs, museums, professional organizations, vendors, and all who are invested in digital library issues. Learn more: https://www.diglib.org/aboutdlf/ How to Express Interest: To express interest in serving as a DLF Community Advisor, write to info@diglib.org before September 1st. Please provide information on your past experience and participation in DLF, and tell us what you feel you would bring to the role of Advisory Committee member. Appointments will be recommended by the DLF Director and president of CLIR to members of the Advisory Committee and CLIR Board of Directors, and will be finalized in early November 2016.